Introducing … Lloyd Miller

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Who is Lloyd Miller?
Lloyd is a mentor and coach, working mostly with senior executives who wish to explore work related issues, both personal and organisational. He is a qualified humanistic psychologist and he draws on 25 years experience in broadcast and corporate media production, as a company director, and as Chairman of the UK arm of a multi-national NGO.

While half his earlier work was related to broadcasting, Lloyd also worked with top brand names on corporate communication issues and helped with organisational projects and challenges.

In recent years he has focused entirely on organizational development work, personal development work and executive coaching. He is also qualified in conflict resolution.

His clients have included, Pfizer, Foreign and Commonwealth Office and Great Ormond Street Hospital to name but a few.

His London-based private practice is www.mentorandcoach.co.uk.

Lloyd Miller on the concept of Heart in Business

“People are emotional, not just functional. Treat them the right way, create the right emotional environment and they perform better.”

I am thrilled to now be an Associate of Heart in Business Limited; management advisors that are a products of their time. I meet so many frustrated or disgruntled employees of corporations that it was inevitable that an organization like Heart in Business would arise in response to the zeitgeist of our present culture. There is so much creativity and goodwill in most people, yet such gifts can be suffocated by organizational structures, procedures and relational issues. The phrases I hear repeated over and over is “I have to play the game” and “if only they would let us do our job”. Many people tell me that they could be far more productive and happy at work if they did not have to spend so much time and energy following protocols, managing delicate egos, navigating office politics or managing tricky relationships. What if there was a way to change the culture of business to alleviate such defeating concerns? Well, there is.

It is heartening to see the Harvard Business Review and other serious business publications giving voice to the call to humanize work and there does seem to be a growing realization that there is more to business than just business. The way forward is to put the heart back into business, to pay more attention to the needs of people and to recognize that in doing so we actually foster greater success and profitability.

People are emotional, not just functional. Treat them the right way, create the right emotional environment and they perform better. Its like any friendship or relationship. If I am respected and feel included then I will participate more. Its human nature. Yet everywhere, the basic building blocks of productive human relating are being overlooked. You can design the best system in the world to get tasks done but if the system is not a good fit with the fundamental needs of human beings then there will be problems.

We spend so much of our lives at work. What if we could do that work with heart? What if we could become soul traders? It doesn’t matter how simplistic the work is, or how routine it is. If there is a good reason to do the work and the critical ingredients of human relating are in place then people can do anything well. I like the analogy of the high-powered executive woman who takes 6 months’ maternity leave. She swaps her sophisticated corporate life for a life of breast-feeding and nappy changing. She might be bored occasionally and miss aspects of going to work but the dramatic change of lifestyle is possible because it is inspired by love and a sense of purpose. There is real heart in the routine.

Heart in Business Limited stands for everything I care about. The most common time for a man to have a heart attack is 9 o’clock on a Monday morning. I want to be part of the initiative to change that statistic. It is time to attend to the heart of what we do and how we do it.

With heart,

Lloyd
www.heartinbusiness.org

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www.heartinbusiness.org